Wednesday, August 31, 2016

The Light Between Oceans: The Reviews are in and I don't like 'em


I’m not happy. The Light Between Oceans opens Friday and the reviews—mostly by men, mind you—aren’t great.

They have a variety of reasons, none of which have to do with Alicia Vikander’s and Michael Fassbender’s performance or Adam Arkapaw’s stunning cinematography. Mostly, they fault the material—based on the book by M.L. Stedman—devastating and emotional certainly, and director Derek Cianfrance’s attraction to it. 

Here’s a sampling.

relentlessly old-fashioned, down to the sexual politics 
[The Verge~Tasha Robinson] 

there’s no denying that the movie, while lavishly shot and acted with impeccable gravity, has the operatic manipulativeness of a deeply solemn chick flick posing as art.
 [Variety~Owen Gleiberman]

The cathartic pleasures of a good old-fashioned weepie are promised and then never delivered in Derek Cianfrance's handsome but curiously lifeless The Light Between Oceans.
[The Hollywood Reporter~Jon Frosch]

Alicia Vikander Shines Bright In A Rocky Period Romance  
[IndieWire~David Ehrlich]

Alicia Vikander Flirts With Tragedy, Settles Down With Sap  
[The Wrap~Alonso Duralde] 

Soap gets in your teary eyes 
[Chicago Sun Times~Richard Roeper]

Ugh. That’s enough. I’m still heading out to my local theater on Friday. I am hoping that the film, like the book by Stedman, will move me in ways that left the critics cold. How about you?














Tuesday, August 30, 2016

"A little nonsense now and then is relished by the wisest men." RIP Gene Wilder

There are so many films to remember Gene Wilder by. The Producers. Silver Streak. Blazing Saddles. Young Frankenstein. 



For many of us Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory, adapted from the Roald Dahl classic Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, by the author himself, remains a sentimental favorite, resonating with our inner child. All those bratty kids getting their come-uppance while Charlie, sweet Charlie, good, decent, endearing boy got what he had coming to him as well. All meted out with a devilish undercurrent by Gene Wilder as Willy Wonka. If only life were really like that! The Violets of the world changed into big fat bursting blueberries. The Mikes reduced to ant-like pests and nothing more!



Gene Wilder couldn't have done it without a heartwrench performance from Peter Ostrum as Charlie and Jack Albertson as Grandpa Joe.

RIP Gene Wilder 
6/11/1933—8/29/2016

Thank you for bringing us a little nonsense now and then.




I've just learned that the cause of Gene Wilder's death yesterday was due to complications from Alzheimer's disease. The diagnosis was kept private, possibly because the disease stole the Gene Wilder we know from his friends and family long before his actual death. That's how Alzheimer's—the disease that took my mother over ten years before she actually died at age 86—works. 


Monday, August 29, 2016

Ingrid Bergman: Five of My Favorite Ingrid Bergman Movie Moments



In an odd quirk of fate, the legendary Ingrid Bergman was born and died on the same day. Born August 29th, 1915 in Stockholm, Sweden, the iconic star died 67 years later in the Chelsea neighborhood of London, on August 29th, 1982. 

I love what director George Cukor said about Ingrid Bergman: “She never lost that innocent quality of wonder.” I think the director of Gaslight, the only film Cukor and Bergman made together, got it right.


Classic Clips

I found lovely moments from Indiscreet, Casablanca, Notorious, The Inn of the 6th Happiness, and an intense scene from Gaslight, before I happened upon this gorgeous homage video from RubyDee717. For me the only thing it needs is more Cary Grant!  



Ingrid Bergman Homage

Indiscreet 1958 

Casablanca 1943 


Notorious 1946


The Inn of the 6th Happiness FINALE 1958 


Gaslight 1944


I know, I know! There are so many fabulous Bergman movies. What fave of yours am I missing? 
For Whom the Bells Tolls? Spellbound? Cactus Flower? 
Give it to me straight in the comment section.


Sunday, August 28, 2016

Slacker Sunday: Kristen Stewart talks Certain Women

For the next several Sundays I’m featuring conversations with some of the most interesting women actors working today. Like many book2movie fans I’ve got my eye on several movies based on books with The Light Between Oceans, Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children, The Girl on the Train, Certain Women, Billy Lynn's Long Halftime Walk, Arrival and Nocturnal Animals topping my list. Why? They star or costar some of the most exciting actresses working today, young women that seem destined to dominate this year’s movie buzz: Alicia Vikander, Eva Green, Emily Blunt, Kristen Stewart and Amy Adams. 


I began last week with a video interview I shared in which Alicia Vikander talked about one of the fall season’s most exciting book2movie adaptations, The Light Between OceansContinuing in that vein, this week’s Slacker Sunday Video features Kristen Stewart on working with Kelly Reichardt in Certain Women. The film is an unusual weaving together of three Maile Meloy’s short stories starring Stewart, Michelle Williams, Laura Dern and Lily Gladstone. Certain Women is set for release on October 14th. 


Kristen Stewart’s storyline is based on Travis, B. but veers from Maile Meloy’s telling in that Reichardt has substituted a young woman—played by Lily Gladstone—for the presumably male ranch hand in Meloy’s story. 

Listen to William Hurt read the story, Travis, B.

Here’s Stewart from Sundance where the film made its debut.





Which fall film are you most excited to see?

Saturday, August 27, 2016

A Single Man: Saturday Matinee Celebrates Tom Ford's 55th Birthday


I’m about two thirds of the way through Austin Wright’s riveting Tony and Susan and growing more and more intrigued to see how Tom Ford is going to bring the book to the screen in Nocturnal Animals. Nocturnal Animals is the title of the book within the book, a thriller that has me, like Susan, in its grips. We’ve talked about the upcoming film starring Amy Adams and Jake Gyllenhaal set for release on December 9th. The movie’s director, fashion designer Tom Ford, is celebrating a birthday today, his 55th. With A Single Man and now Nocturnal Animals in his pocket, the addition of ‘filmmaker’ to his google profile seems fitting. Maybe next year Tom!


Since Ford’s big day falls on a Saturday this year, A Single Man is our Saturday Matinee. I don’t know about you but I had no idea, none, that the film was based on a book by Christopher Isherwood. In my head Isherwood, the famously gay writer, is so closely linked with the 1930’s via The Berlin Stories—which became Cabaret, among other things—that I never discovered his later work. Isherwood, who taught a class at Cal State LA wrote A Single Man in 1964, a semi-autobiographical novel about the day in the life of a gay English professor in Los Angeles. 


The film version stars Colin Firth as George, the college professor mourning the death of his partner. Firth’s performance won him the Best Actor BAFTA with nominations for the Oscar, Golden Globe and SAG awards. AFI awarded the film its top honor—Movie of the Year—saying:
A SINGLE MAN marks the singular and stylish debut of writer-director Tom Ford, whose astoundingly assured transition from fashion to film - from the human body to the human spirit - is a perfect fit for Christopher Isherwood's story of love and loss. As a heartbroken college professor and his lovelorn compatriot, Colin Firth and Julianne Moore offer achingly honest performances that inhabit a perfectly realized 1962 Los Angeles. A SINGLE MAN is a meditation on grief, a sensuous lament, a memento mori that reminds us to love well, to cherish the human encounters that color our lives and to be aware, in the end, that everything is as it should be.
Julianne Moore is fantastic as George’s friend Charley, a woman who has more than platonic feelings for George, feelings which George doesn’t return. Nicholas Hoult appears as the sexy, young object of admiration for George, while Matthew Goode is Jim, George’s long-time partner, now deceased.


It’s a must see, not only for the haunting story and the acclaimed performances, but for the exquisite period rendering of Los Angeles, circa 1962 with both the costume and production design bringing the look of sixties Southern California to life. I’m thinking about going on a location hunt to nail down the shooting sites.

A Single Man is available to stream on YouTube, iTunes, Amazon, Vudu and Google Play. As always check your Netflix account.

To be honest, I may not watch A Single Man today. I’m kind of curious to read Isherwood’s book first! 

Let’s take a look at the trailer.


 

Happy Saturday Viewing

Thursday, August 25, 2016

Ithaca: Watch the trailer for Meg Ryan's directorial debut #ThrowbackThursday



Ithaca, based on William Saroyan's The Human Comedy seems appropriate for a #ThrowbackThursday post. The book was published in 1943, the subject was the war (that part's eternal) but the main character was a young messenger boy charged with the delivery of sensitive telegrams, very much a thing of the past. 



Alex Neustaedter stars as the young bicycle messenger

It's also a #TBT because I first toldja about Ithaca in January of 2014. But mostly because the film hearkens back to another time with its reunion of Tom Hanks and Meg Ryan. Not that he stars, mind you. I believe his part is fairly small, done as a favor to an old friend. Meg Ryan. Director. 
The film stars Ryan, her son Jack Quaid, Hamish Linklater, Sam Sheperd and Alex Neustaedter as Homer, the young bicycle messenger. The film's score is by John Mellencamp, cinematography is from Andrew Dunn who has a long line of credits going back to the early 80's and can be seen in the upcoming Bridget Jones Baby.  Ithaca is set for release on September 9th for a limited run.* I'll post it into the correct slot on the Movies Based on Books 2016 page.




This isn't the first time out for The Human Comedy. Andy Rooney starred as the young bicycle messenger in the original and was nominated for an Oscar for his performance. The book started as a story idea for the screenplay with author Saroyan winning an Oscar for his original story.


Wednesday, August 24, 2016

"Something Borrowed's" Emily Giffin's newest "First Comes Love" Adaptation in the Works


I don’t think I’ve read any of Emily Giffin’s novels and yet somehow she’s achieved best selling author status without me. Best selling as in 11 million worldwide. 



I skipped Something Borrowed, both Giffin’s novel about a woman who falls for her best friend’s fiance and the 2011 rom-com screen adaptation starring Kate Hudson.






I didn’t read her follow-up Something Blue either. It’s currently in development. 



Her most recent book First Comes Love, released by Random House June 28th debuted at #1 on the New York Times bestseller list. No surprise then, that the book has already been optioned by Hollywood.


Here’s the rundown on First Comes Love from the publisher

Growing up, Josie and Meredith Garland shared a loving, if sometimes contentious, relationship. Josie was impulsive, spirited, and outgoing, Meredith hardworking, thoughtful, and reserved. When tragedy strikes, their delicate bond splinters.
Fifteen years later, Josie and Meredith are in their late thirties, following very different paths. Josie, a first grade teacher, is single—and this close to swearing off dating for good. What she wants more than the right guy, however, is to become a mother—a feeling that is heightened when her ex-boyfriend’s daughter is assigned to her class. Determined to have the future she’s always wanted, Josie decides to take matters into her own hands.
On the outside, Meredith is the model daughter with the perfect life. A successful attorney, she’s married to a wonderful man, and together they’re raising a beautiful four-year-old daughter. Yet lately Meredith feels dissatisfied and restless, secretly wondering if she chose the life that was expected of her rather than the one she truly desired.
As the anniversary of their tragedy looms, and painful secrets from the past begin to surface, Josie and Meredith must not only confront the issues that divide them but also come to terms with their own choices. In their journey toward understanding and forgiveness, both sisters discover that they need each other more than they knew—and that in the search for true happiness, love always comes first.
Are you an Emily Giffin fan? Should I give her books a chance? 


Tuesday, August 23, 2016

Billy Howle Cast as Edward opposite Saoirse Ronan in On Chesil Beach


I read and loved Ian McEwan’s On Chesil Beach* earlier this year and learned soon after that Saoirse Ronan was set to play Florence, the virginal bride of the novel. A perfect choice. Who, the question was, would play Edward, the virginal groom?


Not an easy find. As Elizabeth Carlson, one of the film’s producers, told Deadline. “The character of Edward has a lot of qualities that are hard to find in young people today. But Billy has all the qualities of strength, innocence, sensitivity and a certain kind of rage that are needed for this complex role.”

Billy? That’s Billy Howle, a British newcomer, whose upcoming credits include The Sense Of An Ending with Emily Mortimer and Charlotte Rampling and The Seagull also with Ronan and Annette Bening. Currently he’s best known for Cider with Rosie, Glue and The Sense of an Ending. Not a complete film and TV virgin.

Dominic Cooke (The Hollow Crown) directs. On Chesil Beach starts shooting in the UK in October with a plan to hit theaters sometime in 2017. 

So? What do you think? I had a few casting ideas for Edward which I posted previously; for me Howle is a bit too pretty but I have a feeling many a younger woman will disagree with me.








Monday, August 22, 2016

Tom Hiddleston Talks His Emmy Nomination for The Night Manager via THR

I missed this interview with Tom Hiddleston talking about his Emmy nomination for The Night Manager with THR's Scott Feinberg. In case you did too, here's a half hour of Hiddleston’s glorious voice. Seriously, could you listen to Hiddleston talk all day? To be honest—and not that it matters—I’d rather listen than look. A superb actor, he’s just not my cup of English breakfast tea. 

I know, Hiddles fans, I know. He has an amazing physique—that’s classier than saying he has a hot body, right? What is it that marks him for me as less than perfect? It might be the shape of his hairline that I find distracting. Hmmm. I wonder how men like it when women writers disparage male actors simply on the basis of surface physical traits?

On the even more gossipy side, Hiddleston and girlfriend Taylor Swift will make their first official public appearance together at the Emmy’s on September 18th. 


Sunday, August 21, 2016

Alicia Vikander talks The Light Between Oceans, the first of fall's must see films


Fall is almost here and with it, a spate of movies that promise that richer note that films released in the last quarter of the year generally strike. Like my fellow book2movie fans I’ve got my eye on several movies based on books with The Light Between Oceans, Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children, The Girl on the Train, Certain Women, Billy Lynn's Long Halftime Walk, Arrival and Nocturnal Animals topping my list. Why? They star or costar some of the most exciting actresses working today, young women that seem destined to dominate this year’s movie buzz: Alicia Vikander, Eva Green, Emily Blunt, Kristen Stewart and Amy Adams.

Today's Sunday Slacker video features Alicia Vikander talking about The Light Between Oceans, the first of the films to hit movie screens with its release on September 2. Vikander and Michael Fassbender reportedly fell in love during the making of the film and their chemistry is all over the screen. 

My plan is to feature additional conversations with these actresses of interest in the coming weeks. Next Sunday I’ll feature Eva Green and Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children slated to open September 30th.


Saturday, August 20, 2016

Saturday Matinee: Catch Me if You Can featuring birthday 'girl' Amy Adams


Catch Me if You Can stars Leonardo DiCaprio and Tom Hanks of course. John Williams score was nominated and Christopher Walken got a nom as Abegnale Sr. But the film also features Amy Adams as an innocent little girl type. Adams was actually 28 when she played Brenda Strong, the naive young thing swept off her feet by dreamy conman Frank Abegnale. While Junebug is generally considered Adam’s breakout role—her 2005 performance is the first of her five Oscar nominations—Catch Me if You Can came 3 years before that. She’s good at seeming naive, vulnerable, almost trembling. Besides Catch Me if You Can, think of Doubt, The Master, more recently Big Eyes

                                    gif via olyaolia.tumblr.com

Amy Adams turns 43 today, no longer a little girl, the actor has two upcoming films that fall under our book to movie-watching eye. Arrival based on the Ted Chiang short story/novella The Story of Your Life and Nocturnal Animals based on Tom Ford's adaptation of Tony and Susan by Austin Wright. I’m just beginning that one right now.


Catch Me if You Can (because I’m also a Leo fan) is available to stream on iTunes, Amazon, YouTube, Vudu and Google Play and, fingers crossed, Netflix.


Check out this scene where Abegnale and Brenda meet and if you decide to watch—or rewatch—Catch Me if You Can, let me know what you think.

Friday, August 19, 2016

Hidden Figures: The true story of African American women crucial to America's space race.



Just as we didn’t know about the women working at Bletchley Park, there are some amazing women who worked quietly, without glory, to help make America's space dreams a reality. More amazing, because these were African American women and in the Jim Crow era, they had to work separately from their white counterparts. Still half a year away, the trailer for Hidden Figures has just been released, probably so we can all get ourselves a little history and science education before we see the film. That’s easy. Read the book. The movie is based on Margot Lee Shetterly’s book Hidden Figures: The American Dream and the Untold Story of the Black Women Mathematicians Who Helped Win the Space Race, and stars Taraji P. Henson, Octavia Spencer, and Janelle Monáe as Katherine Johnson, Dorothy Vaughn, and Mary Jackson, three African American women who were crucial to the success of NASA’s Mercury and Apollo missions. The cast also includes Kevin Costner, Kirsten Dunst, Jim Parsons, Aldis Hodge, Mahershala Ali, and Glen Powell. Directed by Theodore Melfi (St. Vincent), Hidden Figures is set for release January 13, 2017.



About the book from Harper Collins

Before John Glenn orbited the earth, or Neil Armstrong walked on the moon, a group of dedicated female mathematicians known as “human computers” used pencils, slide rules and adding machines to calculate the numbers that would launch rockets, and astronauts, into space. 
Among these problem-solvers were a group of exceptionally talented African American women, some of the brightest minds of their generation. Originally relegated to teaching math in the South’s segregated public schools, they were called into service during the labor shortages of World War II, when America’s aeronautics industry was in dire need of anyone who had the right stuff. Suddenly, these overlooked math whizzes had a shot at jobs worthy of their skills, and they answered Uncle Sam’s call, moving to Hampton, Virginia and the fascinating, high-energy world of the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory.
Even as Virginia’s Jim Crow laws required them to be segregated from their white counterparts, the women of Langley’s all-black “West Computing” group helped America achieve one of the things it desired most: a decisive victory over the Soviet Union in the Cold War, and complete domination of the heavens.Starting in World War II and moving through to the Cold War, the Civil Rights Movement and the Space Race, Hidden Figures follows the interwoven accounts of Dorothy Vaughan, Mary Jackson, Katherine Johnson and Christine Darden, four African American women who participated in some of NASA’s greatest successes. It chronicles their careers over nearly three decades they faced challenges, forged alliances and used their intellect to change their own lives, and their country’s future. Book DescriptionThe phenomenal true story of the black female mathematicians at NASA whose calculations helped fuel some of America’s greatest achievements in space. Soon to be a major motion picture.Before John Glenn orbited Earth or Neil Armstrong walked on the Moon, a group of dedicated female mathematicians known as “human computers” used pencils, slide rules, and adding machines to calculate the numbers that would launch rockets, and astronauts, into space.Among these problem-solvers were a group of exceptionally talented African American women, some of the brightest minds of their generation. Originally relegated to teaching math in the South’s segregated public schools, they were called into service during the labor shortages of World War II, when America’s aeronautics industry was in dire need of anyone who had the right stuff. Suddenly, these overlooked math whizzes had a shot at jobs worthy of their skills, and they answered Uncle Sam’s call, moving to Hampton, Virginia, and entering the fascinating, high-energy world of the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory.Even as Virginia’s Jim Crow laws required them to be segregated from their white counterparts, the women of Langley’s all-black “West Computing” group helped America achieve one of the things it desired most: a decisive victory over the Soviet Union in the Cold War, and complete domination of the heavens.Starting in World War II and moving through to the Cold War, the Civil Rights Movement, and the Space Race, Hidden Figures follows the interwoven accounts of Dorothy Vaughan, Mary Jackson, Katherine Johnson, and Christine Darden, four African American women who participated in some of NASA’s greatest successes. It chronicles their careers over nearly three decades as they faced challenges, forged alliances, and used their intellect to change their own lives and their country’s future.

Check out the trailer ...



Are you in?

Thursday, August 18, 2016

The Aftermath by Rhidian Brook coming to a screen. Keira Knightley, Alexander Skarsgard in talks to star.


Apparently there's been another feverish bidding war; the plunder, the best selling novel The Aftermath from Rhidian Brook. Fox Searchlight was the big winner, no figures quotes but after I learned that Ted Chiang earned $20 million* for his novella, The Story of Your Life, I'd believe anything. The deal is for James Kent who directed Testament of Youth to helm with Keira Knightley and Alexander Skarsgard in talks to star. The script has already been written by Anna Waterhouse and Joe Schrapnel.

1946, post-World War II Hamburg. While thousands wander the rubble, lost and homeless, Colonel Lewis Morgan, charged with overseeing the rebuilding of this devastated city and the denazification of its defeated people, is stationed in a grand house on the River Elbe. He is awaiting the arrival of his wife, Rachael—still grieving for their eldest son—and their only surviving son, Edmund. But rather than force the owners of the house, a German widower and his rebellious daughter, out onto the streets, Lewis insists that the two families live together. In this charged atmosphere, both parents and children will be forced to confront their true selves as enmity and grief give way to passion and betrayal, to their deepest desires, their fiercest loyalties, and the transforming power of forgiveness.
 As near as I can make out Alexander Skarsgard would play Lewis Morgan with Keira Knightley as the wife Rachel. Anybody read the book? It came out in 2014, I'd love to know what you think of the casting. 


Wednesday, August 17, 2016

Arrival starring Amy Adams: Read the novella by Ted Chiang. Watch the trailer.


Last week I shared the first TV spot, a teaser trailer for Arrival. Now we have the full trailer, 2.25 minutes, and clearly, as Jeremy Renner has said in interviews Arrival IS Amy Adam’s movie. Due to the film’s placement at both the Venice and Toronto Film Festivals, and the movie’s November 11th Oscar-baity release date, there’s already buzz that Adams will be in contention for an Oscar. It's about time the 5 time nominee got a win but she'll in tough company with Alicia Vikander sure to be in the running with The Light Between Oceans.


If you want to read Ted Chiang’s original story, The Story of Your Life, I’ve got a link to the novella which we learned back in 2014, sold to Paramount in a 5 studio bid for a hefty $20 million! How many bucks a word is that, I wonder?

If you can’t manage 57 pages, here’s how IndieWire breaks down Arrival which also stars Jeremy Renner and Forest Whitaker. 
“Arrival” is set in the aftermath of an alien invasion. When a dozen extraterrestrial pods enter the atmosphere, the government brings in an esteemed linguist, Louise Banks (Adams), to attempt to decipher their language and figure out their intent on Earth. She’s helped by a military official (Forest Whitaker) and a mathematician (Jeremy Renner). Considering Villeneuve’s knack for twisty narratives (see “Enemy” for example), expect Banks’ attempt to crack the code to yield sufficient psychological drama.




There are aspects of the story that this trailer barely grazes and which have very much to do with Chang’s original title Story of Your Life. I’m very curious to see how much, or how little, of that storyline makes it into the film. 

Tuesday, August 16, 2016

Indignation starring Logan Lerman & Sarah Gadon: Costume Design by Amy Roth

I’m not a clothes horse in my own life but I do understand and appreciate that ‘clothes make the man’—and woman—especially in Hollywood. In the current issue of Pret a Porter, costume designer Amy Roth shares how she created the wardrobe for Indignation, the critically acclaimed movie starring Logan Lerman and Sarah Gadon as a pair of 1950’s college students. 



Roth told the magazine that “she was inspired to create Marcus outfit — a tweed jacket, argyle sweater vest, button-down shirt and tie — after reading Philip Roth's The Facts: A Novelist's Autobiography, in which the author describes a friend coming home from school wearing a similar look. "He thought that was the college uniform and he wanted what that guy had.” 



“In a way, I guess he thought if he put on that jacket, that somehow magically he would become that character in a sense. That’s basically what I did for Marcus, in that I gave him a whole new costume in which to go to school and it wasn’t like the kicked-in, broken-down look. It was actually a very East Coast, Ivy League look at the time.”



While Olivia played by Sarah Gadon is surprisingly promiscuous, certainly by 1950's standards, Roth says “There's nothing about the way she dressed that would ever lead you to think she was about to do what she did. I think it was unexpected and that was the best part of it — that I dressed her like a good girl.’’


“I dressed her like her parents paid for her clothes’’ says Roth, adding that Olivia would have been the girl in school who would have gone shopping before each new school year. “I thought she would have fuller skirts like the New Look, even though it was just at that time coming into fashion. She would have certainly been the girl having the new skirt.’’



Among one of Olivia's most memorable outfits is the look she wears for her first date with Marcus: A white blouse (cut from a dress) paired with a rose-print skirt, which Roth says were both found in a barn in Pennsylvania. She also found pieces for Olivia at vintage costume shop Daybreak in Albany, NY.

Addicted to the fashion of film? This featurette goes behind the scenes of Indignation's costume design.


Monday, August 15, 2016

Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children: From Ransom Riggs visionary mind to Tim Burton's adaptation


20th Century Fox has released a slew of new images for Tim Burton's Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children which I've nabbed in case you missed them elsewhere.








Based on the wonderfully weird childrens' book by Ransom Riggs, Tim Burton's movie promises to be as wonderfully quirky. One of my earliest posts on the book to movie, back in November of 2011 was Ransom Riggs pronouncement that Tim Burton was his choice for director. In the Deadline review I quoted at the time, Riggs was asked who he had in mind for Miss Peregrine. His answer? Tilda Swinton. Because she was "sort of elegant and birdlike."

Here's the official rundown
"When Jacob discovers clues to a mystery that spans different worlds and times, he finds Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children. But the mystery and danger deepen as he gets to know the residents and learns about their special powers."

The movie stars Eva Green as Miss Peregrine with Asa Butterfield as Jacob. The film also stars Samuel L. Jackson, Judi Dench,Chris O’Dowd, Allison Janney, Terence Stamp, Kim Dickens, and Rupert Everett.  After five long years in the making, Miss Peregrine arrives September 30th. 

Miss Peregrine et les Enfants Particuliers: Watch the French bande-annonce


In France, Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children is known as Miss Peregrine et les Enfants Particuliers translated as Miss Peregrine and the Peculiar Children. A mild distinction, the emphasis less on the creepy idea of a home for these oddballs and more on Peregrine's relationship with them. 

As my francophile friend Paulita knows, I love digging up these French-dubbed trailers for her weekly Dreaming of France meme. This week Paulita's post features some handy travel tips if you're traveling to or France in general. A frequent visitor to the country, Paulita knows what she's talking about.

Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children starring Eva Green, Samuel L. Jackson, Allison Janney, Asa Butter-field, Ella Purnell Kim Dickens, Judi Dench, Chris O'DowdRupert Everett and Terence Stamp  opens in the US, Canada, the UK and most of Europe on September 30th. Miss Peregrine et les Enfants Particuliers opens on October 5 in France. Check the imdb listing for your country's release date.

Sunday, August 14, 2016

Slacker Sunday Video: The Light Between Oceans with Alicia Vikander and Michael Fassbender


I can't help feeling the gorgeous trailer for The Light Between Oceans–opening September 2—gives too much of the story away. I've read the novel by M.L. Stedman, so it really shouldn't matter to me, and I know plenty of you have too. If you haven't, get busy. It's a powerful deeply moving book. I grumble because the marketing is an example of our society's current information overload where trailers seem to be mini-synopses of the movies rather than short promotional vehicles designed to fan our interest. Do sights like mine, where I try to share as much information as I can glean about upcoming films, spoil the sheer magic that is movie making? Or do they enhance it? The latter I hope. 


That being said, today's Slacker Sunday video is an exclusive featurette in which Alicia Vikander, Michael Fassbender and director Derek Cianfrance talk about the story behind The Light Between Oceans. The film on which Vikander and Fassy fell in love.



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