Thursday, January 22, 2015

'Half of a Yellow Sun' Title Sequence: Where in the world is Nigeria?


I know you guys go in for interesting looking title sequences as much as I do. After all how much of  the fun of a good Bond movie is all the groovy titles and credits that set up the tone, getting us ready for what's to come? Like foreplay, a good title sequence gets us in the mood. True Detective was a spectacular television show but I'd wager you were mesmerized long before McConaughey or Harrelson spoke their first line of dialogue, knowing you were about to see something dark and special by the chilling tone of the opening titles.

I guess that's why one of my most popular posts is about how the guys at The Morrison Studio created the title sequence to The Two Faces of January, the recent adaptation of the Patricia Highsmith thriller starring Viggo Mortenson, Kirsten Dunst and Oscar Isaacs. While the movie was a bit of a bust, you regularly check out that post anyway, intrigued by the back story of creating those titles. By the way, The Two Faces of January is available on Amazon now; at this point I'll wait to stream it free when it comes to Netflix in February.


Since you like creative title credits and I like creative title credits —and since I just happened to have read a new story by Chimamanda Ngozi Adachi, the author of Half of a Yellow Sun today, I thought I'd share the opening title sequence from the movie based on the novel.  As luck would have it, they were done by The Morrison Studio, the same title design house behind The Two Faces of January. Set during a period of civil war in 1960's Nigeria, the designers felt, for starters, it was extremely important that audiences watching the film know where in Africa, Nigeria was. I think it does that job beautifully.

Following the title sequence is the trailer for Half of a Yellow Sun starring Chiwetel Ejiofor and Thandie Newton.

Ah, yes. Title sequences. A sexy way to start something intriguing.





Half of a Yellow Sun, Trailer


1 comment:

  1. Can't watch the videos on my lunch break at work 'cause it's not enabled here, but I look forward to checking them out at home. This is probably my favorite Adichie book. Until I read it, I don't think I'd even heard of Biafra, much less known what the war was about. I do appreciate how fiction informs my sense of 20th and 21st century events!

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