Monday, September 1, 2014

Madame Bovary starring Mia Wasikowska and Gemma Bovary starring Gemma Arterton: What would Flaubert say?


That Madame Bovary movie I posted about last summer has now made its debut at the Telluride Film Festival. Starring Mia Wasikowska in the titular role, the Sophie Barthes film 
also stars Rhys Ifans, Paul Giamatti, Ezra Miller, and Henry Lloyd-Hughes as Emma’s husband, Charles.

According to The Hollywood Reporter the movie received tepid applause before everyone scurried off to see Birdman, the Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu-directed film starring Michael Keaton. Well, I can't say that one doesn't look exciting!

The French classic, Madame Bovary, of course, has been adapted many times. This time around director Barthes is basing her rendition on a small section from the novel. In this version Emma who marries a country doctor, longs for a more exciting and luxurious life; her boredom sends her into debt and infidelity that finally comes at a high price indeed - her life.  



So far I haven't been able to find even a teaser trailer but she clearly looks like one unhappy camper.  Shot in the Normandy area of France - hey, Dreaming of France friends, this one's for you - by the director's husband, cinematographer Andrij Parekh, the stills at least look exquisite. 

The script was written by Barthes along with along with first timer Rose Barreneche along with a little help, I suppose you could say, from Gustave Flaubert. I wonder if he's rolling around in his grave in Rouen at this latest iteration or if he's too busy pondering Gemma Bovary that other Madame Bovary-inspired movie a modern re-imagining of the Flaubert classic. Both movies are due to screen at the Toronto Film Festival (September 4th-14th); Gemma Bovary making its debut while Madame Bovary makes its' second public appearance. Hopefully, a trailer or poster will ensue.


5 comments:

  1. Hmmm...I remain a little skeptical of both of them, but will no doubt end up seeing both. I've not actually read Madame Bovary, so on the point of book-into-film I shall not be burdened. :)

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  2. I love these sort of period pieces ....the cloths, the fabrics, etc. not to mention the Normandy countryside....so I will most definitely want to see the first.... & a modern interpitation sounds intriguing too. Thanks Sim I am glad to know about these two films.

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  3. I don't think I'd heard of either of those, but hope at least one will make it to small town Australia. I saw (most of) a French film this week for Dreaming of France.

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  4. How can they expect more than tepid applause if they won't even put out a trailer? I agree with Sally, the costumes and settings often can carry a piece like this. I'll still go see it. Thanks for playing along.

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    1. Me too, I'm often finding if I view them as sophisticated travelogues I'm happy enough:)

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